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Warm Beet Salad

2 pounds of beetsAvacodo or olive oil1/2 cup pecans, chopped1/2 cup feta cheeseSweet onion, thinly slicedBalsamic vinegarSpinach or favorite greens, washed and driedWash, peel and cut beets into bite-sized pieces. Put beets in roasting pan. Pour 2 tbsp oil over beets and toss. Roast beets in 350 degree oven until tender about 30 minutes. Remove beets from pan and place in mixing bowl. Use same pan to toast pecans about 5 minutes being careful not to burn. Break pecans into smaller pieces if desired. Add toasted pecans, feta cheese and sliced onion to beets. Sprinkle with a couple of tbsp of balsamic vinegar and mix. Arrange spinach on serving plates. Spoon beet mixture over spinach. Sprinkle more balsamic vinegar over all. Adjust amount of pecans, feta,...

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Tomato Collars

Put cut off buckets or pots around your tomato plants to shelter them from wind and keep them a little warmer at night. It makes watering them easier because you just water inside the pots so you're only watering the tomato plant and not wasting water. Best of all your cute little puppy dog or kitty cat won't lay on them. I have read that this will also protect plants from cutworms.

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How to Buy Good Quality Compost

A local farm dumps manure/bedding in a field all winter long. In the spring there appears a sign "Free Compost". Don't be fooled. It may be free but it is not compost. Compost is organic matter that has been mixed to the correct carbon: nitrogen ratios received oxygen to encourage the movement of aerobic microbes. This movement creates heat which when over 131 degrees will kill pathogens and weed seeds. A big pile of manure/bedding would have to have temperature monitored over at least 15 days and turned at least 5 times to destroy weed seeds and pathogens. Yes, there are many people that do like to add aged manure to their gardens, as long as you understand the difference....

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Testing your garden soil

Garden soil testing can be broken down into 3 categories - physical, biological and chemical. Physical - It's fairly easy to give your soil a physical test at home Structure - squeeze a handful of damp soil, open your hand. Does it fall apart? If it does then it's too sandy. Poke it - if it crumbles apart it's good. If when poked it retains its shape than it has too much clay. Drainage - does rainwater drain away quickly or does it sit on top of your soil. Roots need oxygen that is in the air spaces. Too much water clogs up the air spaces. Water retention - after a good watering does the soil stay moist for days or dry...

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